Imaginary Friends from Recycled Materials

In Disney and Pixar’s hit animated feature Inside Out, Bing Bong is Riley’s special imaginary friend who is part cat, part elephant and part dolphin, with a body made of cotton candy.
What is your imaginary friend made of? Join us in MAKESHOP as we create imaginary friends using recycled materials.

 

This program is made possible with generous support from

 

 

Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization.

Emotional Charades

Emotions can look so many different ways. Pick one out of a hat and act it out at the stage in the Studio! What will it look like to you? Can others guess what emotion you are expressing? Take turns. Let someone else pick an emotion to act out—can you guess?

This program is made possible with generous support from

Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization. 

 

Sewing Imaginary Friends

In Disney and Pixar’s hit animated feature Inside Out, Bing Bong is Riley’s special imaginary friend who is part cat, part elephant and part dolphin, with a body made of cotton candy.

What is your imaginary friend made of? Let’s sew new imaginary friends using fabric, repurposed stuffed animals and sewing techniques in MAKESHOP.
 

This program is made possible with generous support from



Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization.  

 

 

Color Matching

We often associate different colors with different emotions. In the Disney and Pixar hit animated feature Inside Out, each emotion is associated with a single color: yellow for Joy, blue for Sadness, red for Anger, green for Disgust and purple for Fear.

Do colors make you feel different emotions? Do they remind you of different people or experiences you’ve had? Can you describe a memory using only color? Join us in the Studio as we explore the connections of color and memories.

This program is made possible with generous support from

Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization.  

Emotions as Puppets

Each emotion in Disney and Pixar’s hit animated feature Inside Out was created to resemble a basic shape: a star for Joy, teardrop for Sadness, fire brick for Anger, a piece of broccoli for disgust and a raw nerve for Fear.

What would an emotion look like in the form of a puppet? What would they wear, how would they act? Join us in the Studio and let’s make these puppets come to life!

This program is made possible with generous support from

Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization. 

Imaginary Friends from Recycled Materials

In Disney and Pixar’s hit animated feature Inside Out, Bing Bong is Riley’s special imaginary friend who is part cat, part elephant and part dolphin, with a body made of cotton candy.
What is your imaginary friend made of? Join us in MAKESHOP as we create imaginary friends using recycled materials.

 

This program is made possible with generous support from

 

 

Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization.

Color Matching

We often associate different colors with different emotions. In the Disney and Pixar hit animated feature Inside Out, each emotion is associated with a single color: yellow for Joy, blue for Sadness, red for Anger, green for Disgust and purple for Fear.

Do colors make you feel different emotions? Do they remind you of different people or experiences you’ve had? Can you describe a memory using only color? Join us in the Studio as we explore the connections of color and memories.

This program is made possible with generous support from

Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization.  

Emotions as Puppets

Each emotion in Disney and Pixar’s hit animated feature Inside Out was created to resemble a basic shape: a star for Joy, teardrop for Sadness, fire brick for Anger, a piece of broccoli for disgust and a raw nerve for Fear.

What would an emotion look like in the form of a puppet? What would they wear, how would they act? Join us in the Studio and let’s make these puppets come to life!

This program is made possible with generous support from

Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization. 

Emotional Charades

Emotions can look so many different ways. Pick one out of a hat and act it out at the stage in the Studio! What will it look like to you? Can others guess what emotion you are expressing? Take turns. Let someone else pick an emotion to act out—can you guess?

This program is made possible with generous support from

Don’t miss our newest exhibit, Emotions at Play with Pixar’s Inside Out, developed by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios © Disney / Pixar  All rights reserved. Used under authorization.